Skeet Skeet

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It always burned my dog-hide that my little brother was more athletic than me.  It didn’t matter what game it was – whether football, basketball, bowling, or even shooting, he was always top notch whereas I was something much lower rung.

Every day after Thanksgiving, my extended family would get together and do some skeet shooting.  There was no winner, but there certainly were losers.  I was the lame-o nerd who ‘wasted expensive bullets’ and usually just threw some skeets.  Hell, even my cousin who smoked so much that he couldn’t run a lap around a football field could shoot better.  My grandpa who has super progressed glaucoma would laugh.

Every time I was forced to attend, the prayer slipped through my lips, dear Lord, why does the alternative to skeet shooting have to be shopping? 

(135 words)

***

This was a rather detailed picture to write a story about for the Flash Fiction for Aspiring Writers #194!  Just in case family members from my Facebook read this, know that this was only loosely based off real life, and I’m not mad. 

Thanks to Yinglan for the picture!

8 thoughts on “Skeet Skeet

  1. Marnie says:

    I thought for a second it would turn dark at the end, and the narrator would get revenge, but then I realized it was creative non-fiction.

    At least the narrator got a chance to skeet shoot! I only ever got to shoot at cans! 🙂

    • H.R.R. Gorman says:

      A lot of this is framed around Southern honor psychology, much of which is interwoven with toxic ideals of masculinity. I *don’t* like shopping, for real, but part of it was the sheer loss of honor by choosing that option over the skeet shooting.

      • Sophia Ismaa says:

        I’m currently reading Gone with the Wind and the Wilkes are being frowned up for their interest in books, music and poetry as opposed to shooting and drinking. I have seen on WordPress that southern Americans tend to favour shooting and hunting, but I had no idea that these ideas of ‘masculinity’ were still heavily prevalent. Or is this changing, at least even a little bit?

      • H.R.R. Gorman says:

        I think it depends. I now live in a more suburban area, one of the most progressive in the south, and I’d say those more genteel areas are coming to appreciate art and stuff. The rural areas, like where I grew up, do not. It makes sense to me, though – not much point in art if you get eaten by a mountain lion or fail to feed yourself when the crops all die.

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